More Bang for Your Buck: A Fresh Perspective on Sex and Money

October 5, 2020
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Antiquated cultural taboos

Salt-N-Pepa may have started the conversation 30 years ago, however, while money and sex are still considered taboo conversation topics in our culture, they are unavoidable in daily life.  Everyday we’re forced to think about money and we see sex used to advertise pretty much everything (including money)—but shhhh, we’re not supposed to talk about it. 

Avoiding these ‘delicate’ conversations means that 74% of 13-21 year olds were taught nothing about financial literacy and the staggering lack of sex education at home and at school, has forced young people to turn to porn as a substitute for appropriate education. It shouldn’t be a surprise that these areas [money and sex] offer enormous potential for re-education and social empowerment.

Social value in education

There’s immense social value in reteaching people what they thought they knew, particularly with regards to financial literacy and appropriate sexual values. While DigitalAMN has established methods of addressing the educational gap in finance, startup MakeLoveNotPorn (MLNP), is tackling the social agenda surrounding good sexual values. MLNP has devised a clever and unique profit sharing business model that produces a crapload of money, while changing porn culture for the better. Cindy Gallop’s lucrative business model gives consumers what they want: real world porn that’s separate from the ubiquitous demeaning and degrading mainstream content. Similar to DigitalAMN, MLNP proves that it’s possible to make money, while also positively impacting the world—this especially includes a re-education on everythig we’ve learned about money and sex… which is virtually nothing, really.

Pandemic as a catalyst

Porn has been on the internet for decades, and generations are growing up with full access to it on the phones in their pockets. Unfortunately however, the ripple effects from decades of porn have had disastrous cultural consequences. Interestingly, the pandemic has led to surges in sextech, as a new world of dating and mating is being navigated in real time, and consumers are actively searching for products that fit their values and needs. The world of porn and sex toys has been upended as lockdown orders and social distancing were implemented, and this sudden shift has presented startups like MLNP with fresh opportunities and markets.

This same disruption is happening with online trading, which people have been doing for nearly three decades. Similarly, while generations have grown up technically having access to the financial markets, interestingly though, they’ve had little interest or worse, no knowledge of ‘how.’ With the world unfortunately succumbing to Covid-19, first time traders are hurtling themselves into the financial markets through democratized trading apps like Robinhood, with no real idea of what they’re getting themselves into, leaving a void of opportunity for fintech startups, financial educational platforms, curriculums and even equity crowdfunding.   

There’s a quiet storm

Many people were raised to believe that money and sex should not be discussed openly, but it’s crucial to educate people so they are empowered to make the best decisions for them without hurting or alienating others—whether that’s about financial literacy or appropriate sexual values. And it’s very important that this education is comprehensive and begins early in life. Our culture can only benefit from positive education and awareness on both fronts, and like DigitalAMN, startups such as MLNP not only prove that making money and improving society are not mutually exclusive, doing so can be achieved by addressing and breaking taboos, in meaningful and responsible ways. It only took a pandemic to prove that!

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